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AGATHA CHRISTIE. The Tuesday Club Murders (1933).

07 Aug

The British title of this story collection, Thirteen Problems, is prosaically accurate but lacks the sly poetry of its U.S. counterpart. The American title points to the animating tension that underlies the world of Miss Marple, who appears here in her second book. (Her first appearance between hard covers came in the novel Murder at the Vicarage, published in 1930. In fact, though, several entries in this collection saw publication in magazines before then.) TuesdayClub1.jpg The premise of the book is contrived but charmingly simple: A half-dozen stolid, middle-class types agree to gather on Tuesday evenings for a spot of peaceful conviviality. Instead of chatting about their gardens or gossiping about the new vicar’s wife, however, the members of this club swap accounts of hitherto unsolved mystery and vie to see which of them can crack each puzzle. Not every story in the collection contains a murder—in that regard, the Stateside title is a misnomer—but each one hinges on an episode of violence or criminal deceit. It’s not the sort of thing that usually makes for very clubbable fare. And that, of course, is the genius of the Tuesday Club conceit: These stories are suitable for polite discussion. There are thrills, and occasionally there is a bit of gore, but there is nothing that might truly threaten the order that prevails in St. Mary Mead, as Christie calls her version of Mayhem Parva.

In each of the tales on offer, Christie strives to build up to a double-twist ending. Along with delivering an unexpected solution to a crime problem, she aims to startle readers by bringing forth a least-likely sleuth. Time and again, Miss Marple emerges from her cozy, self-knitted shawl and softly utters the words that will dispel the mystery at hand. Occasionally, the quest for surprise falls short of its mark. Several of these short stories achieve their effect precisely because they’re so short: No sooner does Christie set the telltale clues in place she than lets Miss Marple spring the pivotal revelation upon her readers. Even a brief pause for a thorough dissection of those clues, or for an exploration of mood or setting or character, would give a reader time to see the childishly simple trick upon which the mystery (such as it is) turns.

TuesdayClub2.jpgBut a few entries in this compendium hold the promise of something more. “The Idol House of Astarte” takes place in and around a reputedly sacred grove where Lady Diana Ashley, an ethereal beauty who inspires a cult-like devotion in certain men, meets with death by stabbing. In “The Bloodstained Pavement,” an artist paints a charming country-town scene and finds that her brush has rendered a grisly clue to a devious murder plot. “The Blue Geranium” builds a classic domestic poisoning case around a series of quasi-Gothic elements: an ill-tempered wife who can’t leave her bed, a fortune teller who sends cryptic notes of warning, a patch of wallpaper that suddenly changes color. Each of these episodes from the Marple casebook could easily serve as the nucleus of a longer, richer tale of intrigue and misdirection. In them, as in much of her best work, Christie demonstrates a near-magic ability—shown only by small crew of writers (Stevenson, Conan Doyle, and Wodehouse come to mind)—to toss off tales that simultaneously possess the solemn force of myth and the airy lightness of a comic sketch.

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4 Comments

Posted by on August 7, 2013 in British, Golden Age, Puzzle, Short Stories

 

4 responses to “AGATHA CHRISTIE. The Tuesday Club Murders (1933).

  1. westwoodrich

    August 9, 2013 at 9:21 AM

    I’ve been working through these at bedtime for a few weeks. Like you I think the supernatural (or at least they have that atmosphere) stories work a little better. What strikes me most are Miss Marple’s outfits, which are almost Victorian.

     
    • Mike

      August 9, 2013 at 10:17 AM

      Thanks for checking in here, Rich. Funny that you’ve been reading these stories lately as well. Your point about Miss Marple’s garb is well taken. Making the old gal so blatantly Victorian in appearance wasn’t a random decision on Christie’s part. Christie, in all of her work of this period, seems fairly obsessed with the clash between Victorian and modern sensibilities. She’s keen, for example, on highlighting the contrast between Miss Marple and the other female members of the Tuesday Club—especially the flighty young actress (who’s also named Jane, if I recall correctly.)

       
  2. Kelly

    August 9, 2013 at 10:33 AM

    I’m mad for mapbacks, so the first photo set me to drooling.

     
    • Mike

      August 9, 2013 at 6:28 PM

      I love mapbacks, too, Kelly—especially the early ones (like this item) that have that bulbous-looking keyhole logo.

       

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